Meghan:
Watching “The ancestors are meeting because we have met,” it seemed as though time, silence, and hesitation created these multi-dimensional pathways for relationship. Can you speak to what you felt in those moments of listening and communicating?

Kosisochukwu:
I love this question, and appreciate the opportunity to go back to the work, which was created in collaboration with Katherine Takpannie, an Ottawa based Inuk artist and dear friend of mine, in a way that touches on elements of it I’m only coming to see in hindsight. In a way, there are aspects of how this work would speak to and draw attention to hesitation as a generative form of affect that I had envisioned when it was first conceptualized.

I wanted the moments of hesitation when we struggled to find the words to say in our native tongues - struggled even to repeat the translations shared with us by our parents - to speak not only to the colonial violence that has deprived us of our ability to know our mother tongues, to speak them fluently; I wanted those moments of hesitation to also point to an opening, a possibility of making the world anew by reclaiming these languages that have resisted destruction, that were never rendered obsolete and remain ours to learn and breathe life into once more.

Meghan: 
Your work on the relationship between language and imperialism. Can you tell me more about this exploration?
Kosisochukwu:
This exploration is very much an outgrowth of my Masters research into Black-Indigenous solidarities, which itself stems from work I did as a policy analyst with the Canadian federal government leading engagement with Indigenous communities on the development of a national food policy from 2017-2019. That work forced me to engage with the question of what it means to be a Black woman on these lands—for me, specifically, the uncedeed and traditional territories of the Algonquin nation—but it also brought me to question the impacts of colonialism and imperialism in my own connection to the land of my ancestors—to our cosmologies and distinct ways of knowing and being.