Shantha:
You have images of St. John’s drag performer Tara Nova, wearing a dress printed with your art. Are you expanding into textiles and fashion?



Violet:

Tara reached out to me last summer and said she was a big fan of my work, and asked for permission to print some on fabric to make a dress. I was already a fan, so I said yes, and gave her exclusive rights to this one piece and waived the licensing fee. I thought it could help both our public personas, but I would never charge her now because she's my drag mother! That's how it started in terms of more embodied ways. I owe her a lot in that regard. I can't speak to all of the details yet, but there is another drag artist in the city that has a dress made using my illustrative work. Hopefully you will see it on national TV next year. These experiences inspire me in thinking about my own drag practice and my future as a multi-disciplinary artist. It was important for me to begin making these links, and a crucial element I wanted to hone in this residency, to prepare me for later projects of digital manipulation and pattern making. The three hallmark pieces in Liminal Fluids I plan to adapt into textile fabric, and have a drag associated with each.

Drag in and of itself is already very destabilizing and hybrid and chimeric in nature


Drag in and of itself is already very destabilizing and hybrid and chimeric in nature, so I'm very interested in taking that which I paint by hand, to melt and manipulate it digitally. To then take that from the screen back out into the world again, into a different form onto fabric before reshaping it again in fashion. This constant push and pull movement, that fluid, watery moment of form and shape and illustration? I find a lot of beauty and meaning and power in that; moving between and across form and discipline. That's what drag means to me at this time, in my own individual identity as an artist, but also professional funding bodies and fellow artists, they all want to see you grow. They want to see your art take multiple shapes and forms and they want to see expansion and complication. It makes perfect sense for me to showcase technical prowess and growth in a way that is meaningful and exciting and fun for me. I didn’t go to a traditional art school, but I've no desire to do an MFA at this time. For the projects I'm most interested in I’d like to build up some of my specialized skills working with textiles first.